More Voilá!!! …and Jan the Filmmaker

Yesterday, Abdalrahem Alarjan came over and photographed the completed Seven Women’s House Keys canvas. Being a professional photographer, Raheem’s photographs are a lot better than mine. I sent Raheem’s images to Sophia, my blog manager and editor. Sophia cropped and cleaned them up and now some of the incredible amount of detail–that wasn’t visible in my previously posted photograph which I took with my camera–is visible, as is apparent in the following photographs:   [Click on images to enlarge]

7 Women's House Keys, finished tapestry
7 Women’s House Keys, finished tapestry
7 Women's House Keys canvas, cropped to centre detail
7 Women’s House Keys canvas, cropped to central details 

For reference, I labeled a photograph of the canvas, identifying the embroidery appliqué patterns with the villages from which they came:

Detail of embroidery patterns labelled by village of origin
Detail of embroidery patterns labelled by village of origin

• The Names of the Palestinian refugee camps in Palestine, Syria, Lebanon, and Jordan are written in Arabic on the border.

Beaded calligraphy, names of villages
Beaded calligraphy, names of villages

• The trim on the edge of the canvas is an embroidery design used by all of the villages.

Tapestry border trim
Tapestry border trim

The following provides links to information about each of the village’s identified on the canvas:

Al-Masmiyya al-Kabira, Gaza
http://www.palestineremembered.com/Gaza/al-Masmiyya-al-Kabira/

Bayt Mahsir, Ramla
http://www.palestineremembered.com/Jerusalem/Bayt-Mahsir/index.html

Jerusalem http://www.palestineremembered.com/JerusalemTownsSnapshot.html

Beer Sheba
http://www.palestineremembered.com/Beersheba/Beersheba/

Dura, Hebron http://www.palestineremembered.com/GeoPoints/Dura_982/index.html

I must add here that without Sophia Isajiw’s professional skills, knowledge, intellect and steadfastness no one would be reading this blog because it wouldn’t exist. I write and Sophia edits my writing. I upload photographs and Sophia color corrects, posts and labels them and designs the “exceptional” layouts for each blog. I’ve gotten messages from previously unknown people, from all parts of the world, requesting my professional services to design their blog. I could actually have a paying job, an income from this, but, alas, I have no idea how to design a blog or how to do the layout for this one. Morgan Norris (see “People Helping Suzie” page) set up my blog, which was an exceptional feat on her part. Sophia has been managing the blog ever since I arrived in Jordan. I respond to requests for blog services by answering, “Yes! Isn’t this great? I think so too. I have no idea how it’s done, but Sophia knows!”

hands
This image inserted by Sophia. [slightly altered from: hdwallpapers4free]
“Jan the Filmmaker” came to see me in Amman to film my Seven Women’s House Keys project. Who is this man all my Jordanian acquaintances refer to as “Jan the Filmmaker?” His name is Jan Parkinson and I’ve known him since junior high school. His recently deceased wife, Marsha Wilson, was one of my closest friends throughout Junior High (Indian Hills), High School (Shawnee Mission East) and the years that followed.

5 7th_grade_1956-57
Marsha and Suzie, 7th grade class photo

Marsha and I both loved making art and were best buddies in Pete Perdaris’ art class– my favorite subject and my favorite teacher! Jan, as it turns out, was into art too (filmmaking) although he wasn’t immersed in it until years later. Jan has been a project manager for Hallmark Hall of Fame and Hallmark Cards in Kansas City for over thirty years.

Jan Parkinson, 7th grade class photo
Jan Parkinson, 7th grade class photo

Jan retired recently, which means he is now even more involved in film projects and books speaking engagements all over the United States. Jan was kind enough to call me over a year ago to let me know that his dear wife–and my dear friend Marsha–had passed away. After sharing some “Marsha and Suzie” stories with Jan, I eventually shared that I would be going to Jordan to do an art project with Palestinian women in conjunction with a Fulbright Scholar Award I’d recently been awarded.  Jan expressed interest in my project and after discussing it further said, “Don’t rush out and buy your première dress yet, but a documentary film sounds interesting.” Hurrah! I rushed out to window shop for dresses, and the next thing I knew Jan was visiting me in Arizona, filming.

Jan visited me twice in Arizona to film my art and the in-progress canvas I would be taking with me to Jordan. I left Arizona for Jordan on August 23, 2013. After I was in Amman for a couple of months, Jan visited for approximately a week. We had a whirlwind six days with an overly-packed schedule of meetings with people and filming. Every second of Jan’s waking hours was spent filming or going to the next film location to meet someone related to the Seven Women’s House Keys project.

Jan and Amira
Jan and Amira

The schedule included documenting the women working collaboratively on the canvas and sharing their “stories” about how they ended up in Jordan (with the aid of Amira’s translation skills):

Jan interviewed Alain McNamara, the Director of Fulbright in Jordan, at the Fulbright House.

Fulbright House
Fulbright House 
Jan and Alain McNamara
Jan and Alain McNamara

He also filmed the stories told by six artists who have familial roots in Palestine. I invited the following artists to participate in an upcoming exhibition I arranged in Amman that highlights the canvas 7 Women’s House Keys: Abdalrahem Alarjan (photography), Ahmad Canaan (painting); Hanan Al Khalidi (prints and painting), Mohammad Abuzraiq (painting), Abul Hay Mossallam (painting), and Abeer Foad (poetry).

The exhibition will open January 8, 2014 at Artisana Gallery 14. The director of the gallery, Hind Mango Nasser, is creating an installation piece that will be included in the exhibition.

Artisana Gallery 14: http://www.tasmeemme.com/profile/view/507

Jan at Artisana
Jan at Artisana 
Hind Nassar in doorway of Artisana
Hind Nassar in doorway of Artisana

The following are a few photos taken while Jan was filming the artists:

Amira, Jan, and Abuzraiq
Amira, Jan, and Abuzraiq
 Jan, Abeer, Amira filming
Jan, Abeer, Amira filming
Jan and Abeer
Jan and Abeer
 Raheem and Jan
Raheem and Jan

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I was listening so intently to what Hanan was saying when Jan was filming that I forgot to take photographs. Ahmad Canaan had an exhibition and symposium in another country while Jan was in Amman: therefore, his interview will be filmed prior to the opening.

Jan, Amira and I went to Majedah’s embroidery shop, Grand Mother’s Dress, and Majedah took us to her home where Jan interviewed her mother.

Jan had very little time to collect his wits (or eat) before we headed out to our next destination. Here he is collecting his wits:

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Jan’s interviews included Zohreh Sullivan, a Fulbright Scholar from Illinois who is teaching a literature course at Jordan University.

Jan also interviewed Dayala, Amira’s “architect” cousin.

Dayala
Dayala, architect

After filming Dayala, she suggested we meet with her boss, Riad Alkiswani who has an architecture engineering business in Amman with his partner George Kishek. Riad is a virtual storehouse of information about the history of Palestine.

After grabbing a bit to eat at the beautiful tiled and mirrored Rakwat restaurant we went to Alkiswani Architects & Engineers.

Riad Alkiswani was incredibly welcoming and generous. He and his partner George Kishek offered us coffee and soft drinks and talked about life in Palestine and Jordan.

At some point during Jan’s visit we stopped by to interview Ibriheem in his flower shop. We also had wanted to film Yousef, my barber, but his shop was closed.

Ibraheem Wardeh, flowers
Ibraheem Wardeh, flowers
Jan and Suzanne in Ibriheem's flower shop
Jan and Suzanne in Ibriheem’s flower shop

Jan kept his “wits about him” the entire time he was here and filmed more than I’ve mentioned in this blog. Unaccustomed to so much activity, my “wits” disappeared sometime around the fifth day. If they had any sense, they flew to Hawaii for an extended vacation. Therefore, to get the full picture of “Jan the Filmmaker’s” six days in Amman, and the nitty gritty of his film, you will need to wait until his movie is released, hopefully in your neighborhood movie theatre.

Voilá and more voilá!

Suzanne and Jan
Suzanne and Jan
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6 thoughts on “More Voilá!!! …and Jan the Filmmaker

  1. Beautiful story, Suzanne. He high-quality photography really helps convey the intricacy of the work. And how wonderful to hear about Jan’s work on a film.

  2. When you come back, please let’s talk! I have a great space we can do a show at if you are interested! An old church in downtown Phoenix!

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