Tag Archives: Suzanne Klotz

“Three Friends” at Night Gallery in Tempe, Arizona

Three Friends exhibition invitation
Three Friends exhibition invitation

December 7th was the opening night of an art exhibition entitled “Three Friends” at Night Gallery, located in Tempe Market Place in Tempe, Arizona. The three friends are two sculptors whose work I’ve admired for years, Brian Painter and Jim White, and myself. The exhibit runs until February 2, 2014. I wish I could see the show, but I don’t return to Arizona until February 1, 2014. I hope those of you who live in Arizona have a chance to see this exhibition! If you go, let me know what you think.

I was told I’ll be emailed some photographs and a video of the show. When I receive them I will put them on this blog. For now, I’ll show a couple images of our work in the show and the exhibition invitation.

3 Friends 4 Dimensions, is an exhibit of works that ‘play’ with the ‘4th dimension,’ or more simply, they explore ‘time.’ James White, senior faculty and Area Head in the Arizona State University Sculpture area, uses neon light to explore personal identity (in this exhibit represented in shifting sand). Suzanne Klotz is internationally known for her quirky, yet thoughtful paintings, embroidery/mixed media and sculpture. Brian Painter, head of the sculpture area at Northern Arizona University, is a nationally-known kinetic sculptor and metal worker who often uses humor in his art.

James white, Desert Wind Print
James white, Desert Wind Print 
James White, Desert Wind Print
James White, Desert Wind Print

http://jameswhitesculptor.com/portfolio/landscapes/desertwindprint/

Brian Painter, Fredonia
Brian Painter, Fredonia
Brian Painter, Fredonia
Brian Painter, Fredonia
Suzanne Klotz, Balance
Suzanne Klotz, Balance
Suzanne Klotz, Transitioned Souls
Suzanne Klotz, Transitioned Souls

www.suzanneklotz.com

http://tempemarketplace.com/nightgallery/

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The in-progress canvas makes progress…

As I mentioned previously, the villages in Palestine have specific embroidery designs and stitches associated with them. The embroidery process is not simply sewing on fabric. A grid (drawn on paper marked with little “x’s” for each of the stitches is transferred to  a white net-like fabric. The embroidery occurs on the net fabric. After the design is completed, the white threads are removed (see the example of Hanan’s triangular embroidery located beneath her painting of Jerusalem). [Click on images to enlarge]:17.

The embroidery process
The embroidery process

For the painting Seven Women’s House Keys, shapes are cut out of the embroidered yolks of women’s dresses and appliquéd (sewn) onto the canvas:

Palestinian embroidery dress yokes. Each traditional pattern comes from a distinct area. Top left: (black background with flowers) Al-Dawaima, Hebron; center (with brown background & flowers) Beir Maheer, Ramla; right (gold & brown) Beit Mahseer, Ramla. Bottom row: left (red) Jeruslaem; center (orange) Jerusalem.
Palestinian embroidery dress yokes. Each traditional pattern comes from a distinct village. Top left: (black background with flowers) Al-Dawaima, Hebron; center (with brown background & flowers) Beir Maheer, Ramla; right (gold & brown) Beit Mahseer, Ramla. Bottom row: left (red) Jeruslaem; center (orange) Jerusalem. 

 

Embroidery patterns, top row: Contemporary design (no village); Center row, Jerusalem; bottom left, Jerusalem; bottom right, Hebron.
Embroidery patterns, top row: Contemporary design (no village); Center row, Jerusalem; bottom left, Jerusalem; bottom right, Hebron.

The last elements applied to the canvas are the sewn-on glass and brass beads. Creating a frame around the entire composition are the names of the Palestinian refugee camps, which are written in Arabic and beaded: 19.

We still have months of work to do, sewing and beading. Yet, it is slowly (but surely) coming together! …What do you think?

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The Salon’s “Cast of Characters” changes…

The primary artist with whom I’m working on the 7 Women’s House Keys salon artwork is Hanan Al-Khalidi. Hanan is an elementary school art teacher in Zarca. She is married and has three lovely daughters in their early twenties. I hired one of Hanan’s daughters, Amira (“Princess,” in Arabic) as my secretary. I recently changed Amira’s title from secretary to Embroidery Salon and Art Exhibition Manager. Without Amira, communication would be at a standstill. As I mentioned previously, Amira was awarded a bachelor’s degree in linguistics and is fluent in Arabic, English, Korean and Japanese. She is also a highly proficient organizer.

Amira Al-Shadowh, Embroidery Salon and Art Exhibition Manager
Amira Al-Shadowh, Embroidery Salon and Art Exhibition Manager
Hanan Al Khalidi, artist
Hanan Al-Khalidi, artist

Without Hanan the embroidery art salon would have fizzled into nothing…

7 Women's House Keys canvas.
7 Women’s House Keys almost bare canvas

My intent with the art salon was to pay the professional women embroiderers an amount that more than compensated them for their work. I severed ties with the original person I hired to help organize the art salon after being informed that he was taking a commission (of over half) out of the amount the women were being paid.

During the two art salon sessions I held in my apartment, prior to learning about the “commissions,” one of the attendees, Majedah Abd Al-Kader, and I became friends. The work Majedah did on the canvas exemplified her exceptional design and embroidery skills. Majedah owns her own shop, Grand Mother’s Dress, and has been embroidering professionally for eighteen years.

Majedah Abd Al-Kader, embroidery artist
Majedah Abd Al-Kader, embroidery artist

Hanan, Amira and Majedah have visited often to work on the canvas. Majedah’s sister will be working on the canvas and Hanan retained the embroidery services of two women teachers at her school. I am the seventh woman working on the Seven Women’s House Keys canvas. Thanks to Hanan and Majedah, the canvas will be completed by the scheduled exhibition date, December 18. [click on any image to enlarge or read descriptions]:

Two people who have been very supportive of all of my efforts are Raheem (photographer Abed Al Raheem Al Arjan, see earlier post entitled: “Getting down to art business”) and artist Mohammad Abu Zraiq (see earlier post entitled: “Tribal Identities”).

Raheem and Mohammad
Raheem and Mohammad

Raheem with in-progress canvas
Raheem with in-progress canvas

Without the support and friendship of Hanan, Amira, Majedah, Rheem and Mohammad Abu Zraiq, the art salon and exhibition would have become a “pie in the sky dream.” Thanks to them, the dream is manifesting as reality…!